Thursday, July 20, 2006

The American Diabetes Association

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has updated its exercise recommendations for people with Type 2 diabetes. Based on a thorough review of exercise research to date, the ADA now recommends varying amounts of physical activity, depending on the person's health goals.

Regards,


Joe Moore

IHRSA


The American Diabetes Association

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has updated its exercise recommendations for people with Type 2 diabetes. Based on a thorough review of exercise research to date, the ADA now recommends varying amounts of physical activity, depending on the person's health goals.

To improve control of blood glucose, maintain a healthy weight, and lower the risk of heart disease, most people with Type 2 diabetes should accumulate 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity each week. Moderate-intensity physical activity is that which raises your heart rate but doesn't leave you out of breath; brisk walking, bicycling, dancing, and swimming are examples. Alternatively, you can aim for 90 minutes a week of more vigorous activity, such as jogging or high-impact aerobics. However intense the activity, you should engage in physical activity on at least three days of the week, and you shouldn't go more than two days in a row without getting any exercise.

People for whom preventing heart disease is a particular concern may benefit from getting at least four hours of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity a week. For people trying to lose 30 pounds or more and keep it off, the ADA says that increasing the goal to seven hours a week may help.

In addition to aerobic physical activity, the ADA recommends that most people with Type 2 diabetes do resistance exercise, such as weight training, three times a week. People who are new to exercising with weights should get instruction so that they don't injure themselves by using them incorrectly.

The ADA cautions that not all types of exercise are for everyone. For example, people with heart problems may need to avoid vigorous aerobic exercise, and people with peripheral neuropathy may need to avoid weight-bearing activities. You should talk to your doctor before beginning an exercise program, particularly if you have a complication of diabetes, have been inactive for a while, or are planning to do anything more vigorous than brisk walking.

1 Comments:

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